POLLUTION AND SKIN:
ORIGINS AND POTENTIAL TREATMENTS

 

Atmospheric pollution: a danger for the health of your skin.

The synergistic action of environmental prooxidants amplifies skin aging.

The skin is the mean interface between our body and the external environment. It acts as a biological barrier against a range of chemicals and physical environmental pollutants. It is defined as the first defense against the environment because of its constant exposure to oxidants, including ultraviolet (UV, UVA, UVB), infrared (IR), visible light (VL) and other environmental pollutants such as fine particles, diesel and domestic exhaust gases and fossil fuel combustion gases (fuel oil, coal, diesel ...), cigarette smoke (CS), halogenated hydrocarbons, heavy metals and ozone (O3).

 

Exposure to environmental prooxidants induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the generation of bioactive molecules that damage the cells of the skin (1). In China, the number of hospital visits for skin problems specially increase during episodes of atmospheric ozone pollution (2). A recent clinical study showed that pollution aggravates atopic dermatitis, with Ultra-Fine Particles (PUF or UFP) that are suspected of exacerbating the inflammation phenomenon.

 

In Caucasian-type women over 70 (3), exposure to pollution correlates with signs of skin aging such as brown spots and wrinkles. Although the mechanisms of the effects of pollution on the skin are not yet well known, the different components of pollution have been studied to understand their very harmful effects (4)

 

The different atmospheric pollutants.

The term “pollution” is usually emploied, but it globalises the large number of compounds it contains. It is composed of air pollutants from exhaust gases (CO, SO2, hydrocarbons), combustion-related emissions (NO2), ozone formed from pollutants transformed by UV rays. Pollution alsp contains solid particles, and those smaller than 2.5 micrometers are likely to reach the alveoli of the lungs and the smallest cutaneous corners such as pores.

 

The main pollutants in the atmosphere can be divided into two groups: gases and solid particles (dust, fumes). It is estimated that gases account for 90% of the total mass of pollutants released into the air and particles the remaining 10%. 

Air pollution is the result of many factors: energy production, intensive agriculture, extractive, metallurgical and chemical industries, road and air traffic, incineration of household waste and industrial waste, etc. ...

 

The pollutants of the atmosphere act at different scales: some gaseous compounds have no effect locally but can disrupt the global climatic balance, while others are particularly virulent for local and regional health but have a very limited influence on the atmosphere as a whole.

 

Air pollution is most prevalent in urbanized and industrialized areas, not only because of the concentration of industries and domestic households, but also because of the movement of motor vehicles. The spread of large cities has as a corollary transport needs ever more numerous. There is also the burning of tropical vegetation from slash-and-burn agriculture that releases soot, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide.

This pollution remains one of the most important. Pollution is therefore a multiple phenomenon and complex to comprehend in its entirety.

 

Air pollutants and their impacts on the skin.

 

Pollutants

Origin

Impacts on skin

 

Nitrogen oxide

NOx

NOx = NO + NO2

 

All high temperature combustions of fossil fuels (coal, fuel oil, gasoline). Nitrogen monoxide NO emitted by the exhaust pipes oxidizes in the air and turns into nitrogen dioxide NO2 which is 90% a secondary pollutant

 

 

Increased appearance of pigment spots (+ 10µm3 -> + 25% of pigment spots)

 

 

Hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques (HAP) et composés organiques volatils (COV)

 

 

 

Incomplete combustion, use of solvents (paints, glues) and degreasers, cleaning products, filling of automobile tanks, tanks ...

 

 

 

 

Skin cancer (carcinoma) if direct contact (5)

 

 

 

 

Ozone (O3)

 

Secondary pollutant, produced in the atmosphere by solar radiation by complex reactions between certain primary pollutants (NOx, CO, VOC) and main indicator of the intensity of photochemical pollution

 

 

Causes the appearance of wrinkles Causes inflammation of the skin: the skin is then irritated and reactive

 

 

 

 

Particles or dust in suspension (PM)

 

Industrial or domestic combustion, diesel and natural road transport (volcanism, eruptions) Classified according to their size:

- PM10 diameter <10 µm (retained at the nose and upper lanes)

- PM2.5 diameter <2.5 µm (penetrate deeply into the respiratory system)

 

 

May cause irritation and allergies

 

 

 

 

 

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)

 

 

 

Combustion of fossil fuels (fuel oil, coal, lignite, diesel ...) Nature also emits sulfur products

 

 

Alterations of the hydrolipidic film of the skin which causes irritation of the mucous membranes and skin

 

 

 

 

Carbon monoxide (CO)

 

 

 

 

Incomplete combustion (gas, coal, oil or wood) and vehicle

exhaust

 

Responsible for tissue hypoxia (lack of oxygen supply to tissues) which slows down the metabolism of the skin causing:

- Dull complexion

- Skin aging Drought

 

 

Heavy metals, lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, nickel

 

 

Comes from the combustion of coals, oils, garbage and some industrial processes

 

 

Attack the membranes by weakening them. Decrease tissue oxygenation.

 

 

  

Clinical manifestations of pollution on our skin.

Exposure to an atmosphere laden with ozone and pollutants generates oxidative stress, with an outbreak of free radicals and a reduction in the level of key cutaneous antioxidants such as vitamin E and vitamin C (6).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall, the effects of long-term exposure to intensive pollution is manifested in vivo by a loss of radiance, a drop in skin hydration, the eruption of redness or acne and especially premature aging.

Studies showed that women living in urban areas have deeper wrinkles and more pigment spots on their faces than women living in the countryside (7). 

The pollution would cause an over-secretion of sebum (8), making the skin more oily and prone to imperfections, making the complexion duller, causing premature aging of the skin with deeper wrinkles, more pigment spots and sagging skin (9). The cocktail effect of pollutants attack the membranes of our skin cells making them more reactive and sensitive, which increases the risk of developing eczema, dermatitis or psoriasis. 


Solutions to fight against the effects of pollution.

 

The cleansing ritual of the skin is an essential element to keep skin healthy. The urban lifestyle tends to disrupt the essential functions of our skin, making it more oily, dull and easily prone to imperfections. First, it is crucial to clean the skin thoroughly to remove particles and debris that settle on our skin, before applying any other care.

 Thus the action of pollutants on the skin must be neutralized and our cells need to be protected from oxidative stress. At Alphascience, we have worked on combinations of actives that will act on most pollutants, their synergistic action with UV and oxidative stress:

- L-ascorbic Acid: limits damage to UV-related cell DNA (10). It is a powerful antioxidant.

- Phytic Acid: regulates deregulation of sebum due to pollution (11), transforms metals into inert salt (12), neutralizes the effect of PAH, regulates the production of melanin.

- Tannic Acid: a chelator of metals (13), acts in synergy with vitamin C and enhances its antioxidant activity by inhibiting the Fenton reaction (14).

Ginkgo biloba: improves the irrigation of tissues to improve the radiance of the complexion, to offset the effects of carbon monoxide.

  • Ferulic Acid: repairs cellular damage related to UV and pollution (15).

 

 

These actives are also powerful antioxidants that act in synergy to neutralize the oxidative stress associated with the combination of UV and pollution. To go further, it is necessary to measure the impact at the cellular skin level of the combination of UV and pollution, as well as the effectiveness of the assets. Alphascience's scientific teams are developing a novel clinical study on these topics.

 

 

 

 

The author: Alfred MARCHAL, PhD in organic chemistry and MBA, is an internationally- recognized antioxidants and aesthetic medicine expert. He has 35-year academic experience in R&D for pharmaceutical organic synthesis and phyto pharmaceuticals. Author of many scientific articles and patents in particular for vitamin C, vitamin K and hyaluronic acid. He runs ALPHASCIENCE Research Department and is board member in pharmaceutical companies.  

 Bibliography:

1 Jérémie Soeur*, J-P. Belaïdi, C. Chollet, L. Denat, A. Dimitrov, C. Jones, P. Perez, M. Zanini, O. Zobiri, S. Mezzache, D. Erdmann, G. Lereaux, J. Eilstein, L. Marrot. Photo-pollution stress in skin: Traces of pollutants (PAH and particulate matter) impair redox homeostasis in keratinocytes exposed to UVA1. Journal of Dermatological Science 86 (2017) 162-169.

2 Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno A. Bernard, Ph.D. The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161

Frederic Flament, Roland Bazin, Sabine Laquieze, Virginie Rubert, Elisa Simonpietri, Bertrand Piot, Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology 2013 :6 221–232

Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno A. Bernard, Ph.D.The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161

www.thelancet.com/oncology Vol 10 December 2009

6 Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno
A. Bernard, Ph.D. The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161


7 Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno A. Bernard, Ph.D. The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161


8 Jean Krutmann, Dominique Moyal, Wei Liu, Sanjiv Kandahari, Geun-Soo Lee, Noppakun Nopadon, Leihong Flora Xiang, Sophie Seité, Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology 2017 :10 199–204


9 Pollution as a Risk Factor for the Development of Melasma and Other Skin Disorders of Facial Hyperpigmentation Is There a Case to Be Made? Journal of Drug in Dermatology. April 2015. Wendy E. Roberts MD FAAD

10 Stimulation of collagen gene expression
by ascorbic acid in cultured human fibroblasts. A role for lipid peroxidation? M Chojkier, K Houglum, J Solis-Herruzo and D A Brenner

11 Dr Zhong, Soongsil University


12 Phytic Acid Protective Effect Against Beef Round Muscle Lipid Peroxidation. BEOM JUN LEE, DELOY G. HENDRICKS


13 Rice-Evans, 1995 and Liyana-Pathirana and Shahidi, 2006


14 Rice-Evans,1995andLiyana-PathiranaandShahidi,2006


15 Hyung Jin Hahn, Ki Bbeum Kim1, Seunghee Bae, Byung Gon Choi, Sungkwan An, Kyu Joong Ahn, Su Young Kim. Pretreatment of Ferulic Acid protects human dermal fibroblasts against ultraviolet a irridation. Ann Dermatol, Vol.28, No. 6, 2016.

POLLUTION ET PEAU : ORIGINES ET PISTES

DE TRAITEMENTS

 

Pollution atmosphérique : un danger pour la santé de votre peau.

  

L’action synergique des agents pro-oxydants environnementaux amplifit le vieillissement cutané.

Notre peau est l’interface majeure entre notre corps et l’environnement extérieur. Elle exerce le rôle barrière biologique contre un éventail de produits chimiques et de polluants environnementaux physiques.

Elle est définie comme notre première défense contre l’environnement en raison de son exposition constante aux oxydants, y compris les rayonnements ultraviolet (UV, UVA, UVB), infrarouge (IR), la lumière visible (VL) et d'autres polluants environnementaux tels que les particules fines, les gaz d'échappement diesel et domestiques et les gaz de combustion de combustibles fossiles (fioul, charbon, gazole…), la fumée de cigarette (CS), hydrocarbures halogénés, métaux lourds et ozone (O3)

 

L'exposition aux agents pro-oxydants environnementaux conduit à la formation d'espèces réactives d'oxygène (ROS) et à la génération de molécules bioactives qui endommagent les cellules de notre peau[1].

 

En Chine, le nombre des visites à l’hôpital pour des troubles de la peau a augmenté pendant les épisodes de pollution de l’ozone atmosphérique[2]. Une étude clinique récente, a démontré que la pollution aggravait les dermatites atopiques, avec les Particules Ultrafines (PUF ou UFP) qui sont suspectées d’exacerber le phénomène d’inflammation. Chez les femmes de type caucasiennes de plus de 70 ans[3], l’exposition à la pollution corrèle des signes de vieillissement cutané comme les taches brunes et les rides. Bien que les mécanismes des effets de la pollution sur la peau ne soient pas encore bien connus, les différents composants de la pollution ont été étudiés pour comprendre leurs effets très néfastes[4].  

Les différents polluants atmosphériques. 

On parle de la pollution, mais celle-ci regroupe un grand nombre de composés. On y retrouve des polluants atmosphériques issus des gaz d’échappement (CO, SO2, hydrocarbures), des émissions liées aux combustions (NO2), de l’ozone formé à partir de polluants transformés par les rayons UV. La pollution compte aussi des particules solides plus ou moins fines, de compositions différentes, et dont celles de taille inférieure à 2,5 micromètres sont susceptibles de gagner les alvéoles pulmonaires et des moindres recoins cutanés comme les pores.

Les principales substances polluant l'atmosphère peuvent se répartir schématiquement en deux groupes : les gaz et les particules solides (poussières, fumées). On estime que les gaz représentent 90 % des masses globales de polluants rejetées dans l'air et les particules les 10% restants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

La pollution de l'air est la résultante de multiples facteurs : production d'énergie, agriculture intensive, industries extractives, métallurgiques et chimiques, la circulation routière et aérienne, incinération des ordures ménagères et des déchets industriels, etc. ...

Les polluants de l'atmosphère agissent à différentes échelles : certains composés gazeux sont sans effet localement mais peuvent perturber l'équilibre climatique planétaire, tandis que d'autres sont particulièrement virulents pour la santé au niveau local et régional mais ont une influence très limitée sur l'atmosphère dans son ensemble.

La pollution atmosphérique sévit surtout en milieu urbanisé et dans les zones d'activités, non seulement par suite de la concentration des industries et des foyers domestiques, mais aussi à cause de la circulation des véhicules à moteur. L'étalement des grandes agglomérations a pour corollaire des besoins en transports toujours plus nombreux.


Mentionnons également les feux de végétation tropicale issus de la culture sur brûlis, qui dégagent de la suie, du dioxyde de carbone, du monoxyde de carbone, des hydrocarbures, du monoxyde d'azote et du dioxyde d'azote. Cette pollution reste encore une des plus importantes.

La pollution est donc un phénomène multiple et complexe à appréhender dans sa globalité.

Les polluants atmosphériques et leurs impacts sur la peau.

 

 

Polluants

Origine

Impacts sur la peau

 

Oxyde d’azote NOx

NOx = NO + NO2

 

Toutes les combustions à hautes températures de combustibles fossiles (charbon, fioul, essence). Le monoxyde d’azote NO rejeté par les pots d’échappement s’oxyde dans l’air et se transforme en dioxyde d’azote NO2 qui est à 90% un polluant secondaire

 

Augmentation de l’apparition des taches pigmentaires

(+10µm3 -> +25% de taches pigmentaires)

 

Hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques (HAP) et composés organiques volatils (COV)

 

 

 

Combustion incomplètes, utilisation de solvants (peintures, colles) et de dégraissants, produits de nettoyage, remplissage de réservoirs automobiles, de citernes…

 

 

 

Cancer de la peau (carcinomes) si contact direct[5]

 

 

 

Ozone (O3)

 

Polluant secondaire, produit dans l’atmosphère sous l’effet du rayonnement solaire par des réactions complexes entre certains polluants primaire (NOx, CO, COV) et principal indicateur de l’intensité de la pollution photochimique

 

Provoque l’apparition des rides

Provoque des inflammations de la peau : la peau est alors irritée et réactive

 

 

 

 

Particules ou poussières en suspension (PM)

 

Combustions industrielles ou domestiques, transport routier diesel et d’origine naturel (volcanismes, éruptions)

 

Classés en fonction de leur taille :

-        PM10 diamètre < 10 µm (retenues au niveau du nez et des voies supérieures)

-        PM2,5 diamètre < 2,5 µm (pénètrent profondément dans l’appareil respiratoire)

 

 

Peuvent provoquer des irritations et des allergies

 

 

Dioxyde de soufre (SO2)

 

Combustion de combustibles fossiles (fioul, charbon, lignite, gazole...)

La nature émet aussi des produits soufrés

 

Altérations du film hydrolipidique de la peau ce qui provoque l’irritation des muqueuses et de la peau

 

Monoxyde de carbone (CO)

 

 

Combustions incomplètes (gaz, charbon, fioul ou bois) et gaz d’échappement des véhicules

Responsable d’hypoxie tissulaire (carence en apport d’oxygène aux tissus) ce qui ralentit le métabolisme de la peau provoquant :

-        Teint terne

-        Vieillissement cutané

Sécheresse

 

 

Métaux lourds, plomb, mercure, arsenic, cadmium, nickel

 

 

Proviennent de la combustion des charbons, pétroles, ordures ménagères mais aussi de certains procédés industriels

 

Attaquent les membranes en les fragilisant.

Baisse l’oxygénation tissulaire.

 

  

­Manifestations cliniques de la pollution sur notre peau.

 L’exposition à une atmosphère chargée en ozone et en polluants génère un stress oxydatif, avec une flambée de radicaux libres et une réduction du niveau d’antioxydants clés cutanés telles que la vitamine E et la vitamine C[6].

Globalement, les effets d’une exposition à long terme à une pollution intensive se manifeste in vivo par une perte d’éclat, une chute de l’hydratation cutanée, l’éruption de rougeurs ou d’acné et surtout un vieillissement prématuré.

Des études ont démontré que les femmes vivant en zones urbaines arborent sur leur visage des rides plus profondes et des taches pigmentaires en plus grand nombre que les femmes vivant à la campagne[7].

­­

La pollution provoquerait une sursécrétion de sébum[8], rendant la peau plus grasse et sujette aux imperfections, rendant le teint plus terne, provoquant un vieillissement prématuré de la peau avec des rides plus profondes, des taches pigmentaires plus nombreuses et relâchement cutané important[9]. L’effet cocktail des polluants attaquent les membranes de nos cellules cutanées en les rendant plus réactives et sensibles ce qui augmente le risque de développer de l’eczéma, des dermatites ou du psoriasis.

Les solutions pour lutter contre les effets de la pollution.

 

Le rituel de nettoyage de la peau est un élément essentiel pour garder une peau saine. Le mode de vie urbain a tendance à dérégler les fonctions essentielles de notre peau, à la rendre plus grasse, plus terne et plus facilement sujettes aux imperfections. Tout d’abord, il est crucial de nettoyer la peau en profondeur afin d’éliminer les particules et débris qui se déposent sur notre peau, avant application de tout autres soins.

 

Ensuite, il faut neutraliser l’action des polluants dans la peau et protéger nos cellules du stress oxydatif.

 

Chez Alphascience, nous avons travaillé sur des combinaisons d’actifs qui vont agir sur la plupart des polluants, leur action synergique avec les UV et le stress oxydatif :

 

  • Acide L-ascorbique : limite les dégâts sur l’ADN cellulaire liés aux UV[10]. C’est un puissant antioxydant.
  • Acide phytique : régule les dérégulations du sébum dues à la pollution[11], transforme les métaux en sel inertes[12], neutralise l’effet des HAP, régule la production de mélanine.
  • Acide tannique : chélateur des métaux[13], agit en synergie avec la vitamine C et renforce son activité anti-oxydante en inhibant la réaction de Fenton.[14]
  • Ginkgo biloba : améliore l’irrigation des tissus afin d’améliorer l’éclat du teint, pour compenser les effets du monoxyde de carbone.
  • L’Acide Férulique : répare les dégâts cellulaires liés aux UV et à la pollution[15].

 

Ces actifs sont également des puissants antioxydants qui agissent en synergie pour neutraliser le stress oxydatif lié à la combinaison des UV et pollution.

 

Pour aller plus loin, il est nécessaire de mesurer l’impact au niveau cellulaire cutané de la combinaison des UV et de la pollution, ainsi que l’efficacité des actifs. Les équipes scientifiques du laboratoire Alphascience sont en train de mettre au point à une étude clinique inédite sur ces sujets.

 

L'auteur : Alfred MARCHAL, docteur en chimie organique et MBA, est un expert international reconnu dans le domaine des antioxydants et de la médecine esthétique. Il possède une expérience universitaire de 35 ans en R & D dans les domaines de la synthèse organique pharmaceutique et des produits phytopharmaceutiques. Il rédigea des articles majeurs sur ses découvertes sur la vitamine C, vitamine K et acide hyaluronique. Il dirige le département de recherche ALPHASCIENCE et est membre du conseil d’administration de sociétés pharmaceutiques.

 

Bibliographie : 

[1] Jérémie Soeur*, J-P. Belaïdi, C. Chollet, L. Denat, A. Dimitrov, C. Jones, P. Perez, M. Zanini, O. Zobiri, S. Mezzache, D. Erdmann, G. Lereaux, J. Eilstein, L. Marrot. Photo-pollution stress in skin: Traces of pollutants (PAH and particulate matter) impair redox homeostasis in keratinocytes exposed to UVA1. Journal of Dermatological Science 86 (2017) 162-169. 

[2]-3 Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno A. Bernard, Ph.D. The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161

[3] Frederic Flament, Roland Bazin, Sabine Laquieze, Virginie Rubert, Elisa Simonpietri, Bertrand Piot, Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology 2013 :6 221–232

[4]Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno A. Bernard, Ph.D.The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161

[5] www.thelancet.com/oncology Vol 10 December 2009

[6] Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno A. Bernard, Ph.D. The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161

[7] Jean Krutmann, M.D., Anne Bouloc, M.D., Ph.D., Gabrielle Sore, Ph.D., Bruno A. Bernard, Ph.D. The skin aging exposome. Journal of Dermatological Science 85 (2017) 152–161

[8] Jean Krutmann, Dominique Moyal, Wei Liu, Sanjiv Kandahari, Geun-Soo Lee, Noppakun Nopadon, Leihong Flora Xiang, Sophie Seité, Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology 2017 :10 199–204

[9]  Pollution as a Risk Factor for the Development of Melasma and Other Skin Disorders of Facial Hyperpigmentation ‐ Is There a Case to Be Made? Journal of Drug in Dermatology. April 2015. Wendy E. Roberts MD FAAD

[10]  Stimulation of collagen gene expression by ascorbic acid in cultured human fibroblasts. A role for lipid peroxidation? M Chojkier, K Houglum, J Solis-Herruzo and D A Brenner

[11]  Dr Zhong, Soongsil University

[12]  Phytic Acid Protective Effect Against Beef Round Muscle Lipid Peroxidation. BEOM JUN LEE, DELOY G. HENDRICKS

[13] Rice-Evans, 1995 and Liyana-Pathirana and Shahidi, 2006

[14] Rice-Evans, 1995 and Liyana-Pathirana and Shahidi, 2006

[15] Hyung Jin Hahn, Ki Bbeum Kim1, Seunghee Bae, Byung Gon Choi, Sungkwan An, Kyu Joong Ahn, Su Young Kim. Pretreatment of Ferulic Acid protects human dermal fibroblasts against ultraviolet a irridation. Ann Dermatol, Vol.28, No. 6, 2016.